Students foster awareness of illnesses

first_imgBagels, hot coffee and educational brochures about neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) welcomed students filing into DeBartolo Hall on Monday morning. ND Fighting NTDs is raising awareness this week about diseases that plague undeveloped countries around the globe. Club president Emily Conron said these diseases do not receive enough attention because people are not educated about their severity. “When people watch the news, they hear about diseases like AIDS and malaria, not schistosomiasis, and so they think that NTDs are obscure,” Conron said. “Actually, NTDs affect more people than AIDS and malaria combined.” The most common NTDs include leprosy and trachoma, according to the World Health Organization. Approximately 1.4 billion people in developing countries suffer from these illnesses, which could easily be treated in a wealthier country like the United States. “All seven NTDs that we focus on can be treated with safe and effective drugs that already exist and which cost about 50 cents per person,” Conron said. Lymphatic filariasis, a parasitic disease that causes grotesque swelling of the limbs, has already infected more than 120 million people worldwide, Conron said. Treatment is limited in some of the areas that need it most. “The problem is getting these drugs to the people in need,” Conron said. The club’s work on campus is a reminder of the global mission to eliminate NTDs, Conron said, and Notre Dame students can advocate for change. “If the global community makes NTDs a priority, then there is no reason why we wouldn’t be able to eliminate them,” Conrod said. “NTDs are the equivalent of a best buy in global health.” ND Fighting NTDs is putting on a series of events and lectures this week to educate students about ways to fight NTDs. “Our goal is to try to get people talking about NTDs who might not have known or cared about them before,” Conron said. To raise awareness, Five Guys at Eddy Street Commons will donate 15 percent of Wednesday’s profits from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. to NTD charities. Fundraisers around campus this week will include a dessert sale in the LaFortune Student Center on Thursday, a face-painting booth on Irish Green on Friday and a collection at all Masses on Sunday. “Donations are important, but outreach is key,” Conron said. “Contact your government representatives, advocate to pharmaceutical companies and spread the word however you can.” Conron said the club wants to engage the student body in new ways during NTD Awareness Week. “NTDs are an issue that we take very seriously,” Conron said, “But as college students, we recognize that in order for people our age to become fully invested in a cause, they need to be able to approach it in creative and unforeseen ways.”last_img read more

NCUA wants to give CUs greater compensation flexibility

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » NCUA headquarterscenter_img Responding to what it sees as a need to update “outdated and burdensome” regulations, the NCUA on Thursday issued an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking requesting information on how to update regulations related to how senior executives are compensated. Remember, this is an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, meaning it is just the informational stage during which NCUA will gather information which it will use to come out with proposed amendments. It is the latest in a series of proposed amendments the agency has made to update its regulations and provide greater clarity.The NCUA’s focus is 12 CFR 701.21(c)(8)(iii) which authorizes federal credit unions to pay an incentive or bonus to an employee “based on the credit union’s overall financial performance.” I have not dug in and done independent research yet on this provision. According to NCUA, the language has caused confusion for credit unions to provide appropriate incentives to their executives.This regulation applies not only to executives but employees as well. For those of you who provide mortgage loans and are looking for greater flexibility regarding sales incentives, keep in mind that whatever you propose also has to comply with the CFPB’s wonderfully nuanced and complicated loan originator compensation rule. The Association will be coming out with a survey on this ANPR and I am curious how much interest it generates.last_img read more

WHO experts favor single-dose H1N1 vaccine regimen

first_imgOct 30, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – An expert committee that advises the World Health Organization (WHO) today updated its guidance on pandemic H1N1 vaccines, recommending a single dose for most age-groups and advising that any of the forms are safe for pregnant women.At a media briefing today, Dr Marie-Paule Kieny, director of the agency’s Initiative for Vaccine Research, said this week’s 3-day meeting of the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) on immunizations marked the group’s first discussion of the pandemic H1N1 vaccine since mid July, when it took up the vaccine priority question and addressed concerns about low yields with the first vaccine seed strains.”The level of evidence in October is much higher than July, and the recommendations are much more precise than July,” she said.After examining clinical trial data for all versions of the vaccine, the group recommended a single dose for everyone aged 10 and older, as long as such use in line with national regulatory authorities. Though the group said immunogenicity data are more limited for young children, it also recommended that countries that have children as a high-priority group administer one dose so that as many children can be vaccinated as possible.The United States has prioritized children to receive the pandemic vaccine has recommended that those under age 10 receive two doses. Also, Europe’s drug regulatory agency on Sep 23 announced it would stick to its initial recommendation that the three vaccines it approved be given in two doses, because data were insufficient to merit a one-dose recommendation. However, it added that one dose may be enough in adults.At a separate press briefing today, reporters asked Thomas Frieden, MD, director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about the difference between the SAGE recommendation and the CDC’s guidance. He said preliminary vaccine data on children have not shown the desired immune response in children that would warrant a single-dose recommendation. Though the CDC is anticipating new data soon from the National Institutes of Health, “for the time being, we’re sticking with what the ACIP [Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices] has recommended,” Frieden said.Kieny said the WHO group advised that more studies are needed to guide a recommended vaccine dose for immunocompromised patients.Fourteen countries have now launched pandemic H1N1 vaccination programs, she said. In its review of early vaccine monitoring data for the pandemic, SAGE found no indication of unusual reactions, and it found that the events reported so far are well within the range of those seen with seasonal flu vaccines.Given concerns about vaccinating pregnant women, the WHO panel looked at animal studies of all forms of the vaccine and found no evidence of direct or indirect harm to fertility, pregnancy, embryonic or fetal development, birthing, or postnatal development. Given the high risk of flu complications in pregnant women, the group said any licensed vaccine can be used in pregnant women, unless specific contraindications have been outlined by national regulatory bodies.The United States is among countries where authorities have recommended that pregnant women not receive the intranasal, live attenuated H1N1 vaccine (LAIV). Public health officials were in a difficult position when the first pandemic vaccine doses were delivered, because nearly all of them were the LAIV version, though pregnant women are at the front of the line to be vaccinated. However, US officials have recently said the injectable version that pregnant women and other high-risk groups can receive makes up half of the increasing supply.The group also took up the issue of whether seasonal and pandemic H1N1 vaccines can be given at the same time. In a statement today, the WHO panel said clinical trials on coadministration of the vaccines are ongoing, but it endorsed the CDC recommendation that the intranasal versions of the seasonal and pandemic vaccines should not be given together. The group said the seasonal and pandemic vaccines can be given at the same time provided both are inactivated (injectable) or one is inactivated and the other is LAIV.Regarding options for the Southern Hemisphere’s 2009-2010 seasonal flu vaccine, SAGE weighed whether a trivalent vaccine (pandemic H1N1 plus seasonal H3N2 and B) or a bivalent vaccine (seasonal H3N2 and B) plus a separate pandemic H1N1 vaccine would be best. They concluded that both formulation options should be available, depending on national needs.See also:Oct 30 WHO statement on SAGE recommendationshttp://www.who.int/csr/disease/swineflu/notes/briefing_20091030/en/index.htmllast_img read more

Neuheisal ‘ticked off’ at Carroll over vote

first_imgWhen USC and UCLA face off at the Coliseum on Nov. 28, there will be more than a few storylines to watch.Objection · Carroll was the only Pac-10 coach to vote no. – Brandon Hui | Summer TrojanAdd one more to the list: UCLA head coach Rick Neuheisel is “ticked off” at USC’s Pete Carroll.The L.A. Times reported Tuesday that Carroll had voted against having coaches’ children under 18 on the sidelines of Pac-10 games, making him the only voice of dissent in a 9-1 vote.This apparently upset Neuheisel, who has three sons between the ages of 12 and 17 that are reportedly big Bruin fans. According to the Times, he told boosters last month in Westlake Village, Calif., that he was “ticked off” at Carroll as a result. In the video — available for viewing on the UCLA YouTube channel — Neuheisel added that he hoped: “We’re gonna walk out of this room tonight, ladies and gentlemen, ticked off at Pete Carroll, ticked off at all that is ‘SC, and we’re gonna get after their ass, alright?”This may simply be a case of what’s best for each of the coaches, as Carroll’s kids — USC assistant coach Brennan, 27-year-old former Women of Troy volleyball player Jaime, and current USC undergraduate Nathan — are all over the age of 18.last_img read more