All set for hot Gibson/McCook Relays

first_imgALL IS set for today’s 40th staging of the Gibson/McCook Relays, which will take place inside the National Stadium at 9:00 a.m. Things will get started with the heats of the high-school boys’ 4x400m relays, with the final set to bring down the curtains on the event. A bumper crowd is expected as usual, with action set to feature competition among primary, prep, junior high, high schools and clubs and institutions, as they all prepare for their upcoming championships. Chairman of the Organising Committee, Professor Rainford Wilks, is very optimistic about today’s staging despite earlier concerns about the possible impact of the general election, which were held on Thursday. “Plans have gone on well. We have been affected by the general election, mainly resulting in the cancellation of the Howard Aris Memorial Lecture,” Wilks shared. Multiple Olympic and World Championships medallist Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce was scheduled to speak, but could not facilitate the alternate date. “We regret that and hope to hear from her in the future,” said Wilks. He pointed to a fallout in sponsorship, but was very pleased with the level of entries received for the meet. “Entries are at the robust levels. Our plans to welcome a US College team for the first time after many years have fallen through,” he said. Despite this, he expects the usual quality performances. “The quality will be excellent, as seen from the development meets since January. We are very happy with preparations, and patrons can expect a high quality, efficiently run meet in a safe, fun-filled environment,” he added. As usual, a lot of attention will surround the high-school competition as teams will be using the opportunity to fine-tune ahead of Champs. Defending girls champion Edwin Allen, after five victories a year ago will be hoping for another dominant performance at the Gibson/McCook Relays. Following performances so far this season they look well set to win the Class 2, 3 and 4 4x100m relays along with the 4x200m and 4x800m event. After two sub-45 seconds runs this season, Holmwood look set to maintain this high standard and should go all the way, while defending champions St Jago will be hoping to spoil their party. The most outstanding female high school athlete Junelle Bromfield of STETHS will be on show today as she will be hoping to bring her team to their third victory this season in the 4x400m, after brilliant anchor legs at the Milo Western Relays and Digicel Grand Prix finale, where she made up large deficits to guide her team to victories. CALABAR CLASS TWO BOYS Among the high school boys, all eyes will be on Calabar’s Class 2 4x100m relay team and with Christopher Taylor, in their ranks, they look set to create history by going sub-40 seconds. Last year’s top team, Kingston College, look set to dominate in the lower classes, while St Jago and STETHS should battle it out in a competitive 4x800m relays With this being an Olympic year, several leading senior athletes will be on show and following their outstanding performances at the Milo Western Relays, the Maurice Wilson-coached G.C. Foster College/Sprintec will be looking to Anneisha McLaughlin-Whilby, Sherone Simpson, Gayon Evans and Anastasia Le-roy on the female side. Among the males, Andre Clarke, Colin King, Demar Murray and Rasheed Dwyer should feature prominently. The University of Technology/MVP team will be coming out much stronger this time around after playing second fiddle to Sprintec/GC Foster in Montego Bay and they are expected to parade the likes of Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Carrie Russell, Elaine Thompson and Stephanie McPherson on the female side, while the male side will have the likes of Nesta Carter, Kimarley Brown and Andrew Fisher.last_img read more

Dairy Producers Previously enrolled in the Livestock Gross Margin Program now eligible for 2018 MPP

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced that dairy producers who elected to participate in the Livestock Gross Margin for Dairy Cattle Program (LGM-Dairy) now have the opportunity to participate in the Margin Protection Program for Dairy (MPP-Dairy) for 2018 coverage. Sign-up will take place March 25 through May 10, 2019.Producers enrolled in 2018 LGM-Dairy, administered by USDA’s Risk Management Agency (RMA), previously were determined by the 2014 Farm Bill to be ineligible for coverage under MPP-Dairy, a safety net program available through USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA).“The 2018 Farm Bill included substantial changes to USDA dairy programs,” said FSA Administrator Richard Fordyce. “This includes the ability for producers with LGM coverage to retroactively enroll in MPP-Dairy for 2018. It also integrated recent improvements to the MPP-Dairy in the new Dairy Margin Coverage program, beginning with the 2019 calendar year.”The MPP-Dairy program offers protection to dairy producers when the difference between the national all-milk price and the national average feed cost — the margin — falls below a certain dollar amount selected by the producers in a dairy operation. LGM-Dairy is an insurance product that provides protection when feed costs rise or milk prices drop. The gross margin is the market value of milk minus feed costs.This retroactive sign-up is only for dairy producers with 2018 LGM coverage who produced and commercially marketed milk in 2018 but did not obtain full year MPP-Dairy coverage. FSA will notify eligible producers by postcard and provide a one-time payment for all of the months in 2018 that had margins triggering MPP-Dairy assistance.“I’m pleased that dairy producers will now be able to take advantage of enrolling in both Livestock Gross Margin and the Margin Protection Program for 2018 coverage,” said Martin Barbre, RMA Administrator. “The 2018 Farm Bill gave dairy producers more options like these and when combined with the new Dairy Protection Program offered by RMA, that means more overall coverage for dairy producers.”Eligible producers can enroll during the sign-up period at their local USDA service center.last_img read more

Throw It Back. It’s Too Small.

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Now This post was written as part of the IBM for Midsize Business program, which provides midsize businesses with the tools, expertise and solutions they need to become engines of a smarter planet. I’ve been compensated to contribute to this program, but the opinions expressed in this post are my own and don’t necessarily represent IBM’s positions, strategies or opinions.Some prospects are just too small. They’re too small for you to create any real value, so you can’t make an enormous difference in their results. Since you can’t really create a lot of value for them, there isn’t a lot of value available for you to capture much. Even rolling up a bunch of these small prospects won’t allow you to reach your goals; you can’t make your number.When a prospect is too small for you to create any value, capture any value, and help you reach your sales goals, you have to throw them back.It’s nice that they spend in your category. It’s nice that they’re receptive.But it takes time to work a too-small prospect through their buying cycle and your sales process. Sometimes it takes even longer than it does to win a larger prospect. The time you spend working with too-small prospects is time you could spend with larger prospects. Time is the one commodity that, once spent, can’t be recovered.It can also take just as much effort to take care of a too-small client after you win their business. Just like any other client, they have questions, concerns, service issues, and new needs. Your effort is better spent on larger prospects where you can create greater value, where you can make a difference.There are two reasons you are working on these small clients. First, they’re often more receptive than larger prospects, so they’re easier to get in front of. Second, your pipeline isn’t full of real opportunities, and these too-small prospects demonstrate that you have activity. But they aren’t going to be enough.Go and look at the top 20% of producers on your sales leader board. Is their client portfolio made up of dozens and dozens of too-small clients? Or do the top 20% have the top 20% of your company’s client portfolio?It’s too small. Throw it back.QuestionsWhat is your company’s sweet spot? For what size clients can you create the most value?What size client is too small? Why can’t you create any real value for them?Does it take too long to win small clients? Or can you help them without spending any real time or effort?What would your results look like if you moved your average deal size up by 25%?last_img read more