SMC to host international film festival

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership (CWIL) will host the World Cinema Festival from Jan. 27-Jan. 29 in Vander Vennet Theatre.Associate director of CWIL Mana Derakhshani said the College had offered a film festival to the community for over 10 years, beginning with a French film festival and transitioning to a variety of international films.Derakhshani said the film festival complements the work of the College to internationalize the campus.“[The festival] brings to campus major films from other countries that we don’t usually get to see in the U.S., particularly outside of a large metropolis such as New York or Chicago,” Derakhshani said. “In addition, screening foreign films on campus supports the larger college-wide learning outcomes of intercultural competence and global learning.”The festival will feature three films in their original languages, with English subtitles, over the course of three nights. Each film will start at 7 p.m., beginning with the Arabic-language film “Wadjda”, directed by Haifaa Al-Mansour on Tuesday. On Wednesday, “Queen”, a Hindi-language film directed by Vikas Bahl, will be screened. The festival will conclude with “So Young”, a Mandarin-language film directed by Wei Zhao.​Derakhshani said she hopes students will attend and learn something about the perspective of other cultures.“Films are windows into particular cultures and allow us to gain some understanding of certain aspects of these cultures,” she said.Derakhshani said viewing these films is a way to engage with the larger world and prepare oneself to interact with different cultures.She said there would be much in the films that differ from the realities of Saint Mary’s students, though there may be some experiences that are similar.“These three films specifically portray young women or girls’ quest for agency and voice in three different cultures and in three different contexts,” she said. “Noting both differences and similarities will increase the audience’s ability to encounter difference with an ethnorelative perspective rather than a judgmental ethnocentric attitude.“Seeing the world through someone else’s cultural lens helps us understand our own culture and norms better.”Two of the films are in languages taught at the College, Arabic and Mandarin, Derakhshani said.“I hope students learning these languages — or wanting to learn them — will come to hear the language in an authentic context,” she said.Derakhshani said she hopes many students will take advantage of the opportunity to watch the films. The event is free and open to the public.For the complete schedule and more information on the films, visit https://www.saintmarys.edu/news-events/news-releases/world-cinema-festival-2015.Tags: center for women’s intercultural leadership, Haifaa Al-Mansour, Mana Derakhshani, Saint Mary’s College, Vander Vennet Theatre, Vikas Bahl, Wei Zhao, World Cinema Festivallast_img read more

Shifting markets, renewables put the kibosh on a 1,000MW Rhode Island gas plant

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Utility Dive:After days of hearings this summer, Rhode Island regulators voted to deny Invenergy a key permit and made clear they thought a new gas plant is unnecessary. But the written order issued Tuesday provides more insight into the decision, including the delays caused by the company. During the time Invenergy’s application was pending, regulators said there was a reduction in peak load due to efficiency, along with growth of renewables and storage and offshore wind procurements in the region.Experts “presented strong and credible evidence demonstrating that the need for this type of facility would likely decrease in the coming decade” the board said. And reports that were referenced during testimony on the plant “revealed plans forecasting a significant increase in renewables and a continued decrease in peak load.”“The market changes that accrued over the four forward capacity auctions conducted during the pendency of Invenergy’s application undercut the credibility of Invenergy’s original arguments on the issue of need.”The Rhode Island Energy Facility Siting Board (EFSB) on Tuesday issued a final order denying a new gas-fired power plant proposed by Invenergy, pointing to lengthy delays in the proceeding that allowed market changes and the growth of renewable energy to overtake any need for the project.Regulators pointed to the New England ISO’s decision in September 2018 to terminate a capacity supply obligation with Invenergy for one of the plant’s units, calling it “an extraordinary choice” the grid operator had never before made.The EFSB initially rejected the 850-1,000 MW plant in June; company officials say they are reviewing the final order and mulling next steps. The decision can be appealed to the Rhode Island Supreme Court.More: Renewables growth, market changes tanked Invenergy’s Rhode Island gas plant, regulators say Shifting markets, renewables put the kibosh on a 1,000MW Rhode Island gas plantlast_img read more

Clash of the titans

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