Lecture examines works of Percy

first_imgDr. John O’Callaghan, associate professor of philosophy at Notre Dame, discussed the life and literature of author Walker Percy in a lecture Tuesday. The talk was part of the Catholic Culture Literature Series: Strangers in a Strange Land, run by the Center for Ethics and Culture. The four-part series centers around four Catholic-American authors and the contributions they have made to Catholic literature. A recurrent theme in Percy’s works was his feeling that many people knew “how to be in the world and not of it,” O’Callaghan said. Percy’s own childhood was quite traumatic, and it is surprising he was able to step outside this viewpoint, he said. Born in southern Alabama, Percy did not convert to Catholicism until his adult years. At the age of 12, his father committed suicide and not long after, he lost his mother in a car accident, O’Callaghan said. He said these events had a profound affect on Percy and influenced many of his writings. He is well known for works such as “The Moviegoer” and “The Thanatos Syndrome.” O’Callaghan discussed the fact that this Catholic author touches on many subjects, including racism and class. Percy’s moral sense is visible in his outrage “at the cross burning of a Roman Catholic Archbishop of New Orleans who said that segregation was a sin,” Callaghan said. Percy goes farther as to criticize the stoicism of many of his friends and relatives who allowed this to occur, he said. O’Callaghan said this portrayal of ethical strength caused him to reflect on his own education in a Catholic school, questioning why he never read Percy as a part of his curriculum. He said one friend told him Catholic schooling was “all about works and little about faith,” which caused him to ask, “are we any better now?” It is clear after this lecture that whatever Percy was discussing, it was always done with comedy, O’Callaghan said. He said he had a “characteristic humor sly beyond belief,” which gave him a “more universal appeal than just another southern writer.” Callaghan said faith is not something that can be made up, but must be experienced. “We do not produce religious experience,” O’Callaghan said. “[The] sacred comes to us as a kind of message.”last_img read more

Malagò: ‘Serie A must have a Plan B’

first_img Loading… Promoted ContentIt Might Be Quentin Tarantino’s Last Movie8 Best 1980s High Tech GadgetsHe Didn’t Agree With His Character Becoming Gay And Quit A Role5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?Top 9 Scariest Haunted Castles In EuropeFantastic-Looking (and Probably Delicious) Bread ArtWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?Birds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read More8 Things To Expect If An Asteroid Hits Our Planet Coni President, Giovanni Malagò, has claimed ‘there must be a Plan B’ for the resumption of Serie A but knows the playoff hypothesis is not welcomed by everyone. “I speak of agreements with the various components and with the broadcasters. Like the Bundesliga.” Serie A wanted to resume on June 13, but the new decree has suspended all sporting activities until June 14 and one of the alternatives could be the hypothesis of a playoff to assign the championship on the pitch. “If the contagion curve keeps a low index, I think there will be no problem starting a couple of days before. read also:Italian FA chief looking at May return for Serie A “I read [about the hypothesis] and I understand that everyone doesn’t agree. I want to be clear that CONI only has interests if football, or better to say Serie A, manages to solve problems. “I’m not invading the pitch as someone has defined it. I have a proactive, non-critical attitude.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 As Serie A works on the resumption, the CONI chief insists the championship will need alternatives in case of emergency and claims ‘getting there can’t be the only solution’. “For months I insisted that we aim to start again but since it’s not possible to make long-term forecasts, given the existing variables, there must also be a Plan B,” he told La Gazzetta dello Sport. “Not having one is a mistake. I’ll give you an example: Tomorrow, we go by boat from Naples to reach Corsica because the sea is calm, but after a few miles it starts to rise and we must have a plan to either go back or change course. “Getting there can’t be the only solution. The commander must have alternatives. Abroad, the championships have either been shut down or whoever has decided to reopen them or intends to do so, meanwhile, has made everything safe in the event of a new stop.Advertisementlast_img read more